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FAQs for school administrators

The following frequently asked questions (FAQs) help you understand the SEBB Program and how it affects your school district, educational service district, or charter school.

We will update this page periodically.  

Last updated February 21, 2019.

* New or updated February 21, 2019

Do we need to get permission from employees to give their information to HCA? *

No, RCW 41.05.021(1)(a) and RCW 28A.400.280(3) allow us access to employee information.

Will retirees participate in SEBB? *

HCA is studying issues regarding the retiree population. In January 2019, we made recommendations for consideration to the Legislature. For now, retirees are eligible to enroll in the PEBB Program.

Can implementation of the SEBB Program be delayed for one year?

The Legislature, the SEB Board, and the Health Care Authority (HCA) are committed to having everything in place for implementation on January 1, 2020. There is no consideration of delaying implementation.

Can school districts, ESDs, and charter schools opt out?

No. The SEBB Program applies to all school districts, educational service districts, and charter schools within Washington.

Is HCA adding additional staff to support this?

Yes. HCA is adding staff primarily in the Employees and Retirees Benefits (ERB) Division, whose jobs will be to make the transition to the SEBB Program as smooth as possible. Personnel in school districts, educational service districts, and charter schools will retain a very active role in assessing eligibility and aiding employees with enrollment. ERB staff will provide training and support. Additionally, ERB will provide information to school employees ahead of the October 2019 open enrollment to assist them in making benefit selections.

How will HCA communicate information to school districts, ESDs, charter schools, and interested people?

Information is available on our website, including:

We will continue to add information as it becomes available.

You can also sign up to receive email updates on:

What is the difference between the insurance plan year and the school year?

The insurance plan year for SEBB is a calendar year, January 1 through December 31. The school year, as defined in RCW 28A.150.203(11), is September 1 through August 31. Your benefit eligibility and coverage period are based on the school year.

* New or updated February 21, 2019

What’s included in the funding rate districts pay to HCA? *

For every SEBB benefits-eligible employee, the employer will pay the funding rate, which includes the following:

  • Medical premium contribution
  • 100 percent dental premium
  • 100 percent vision premium
  • 100 percent basic life and accidental death and dismemberment premium
  • 100 percent basic long-term disability premium
  • K-12 remittance (for retirees)
  • Administration

Can the Legislature change the benefit allocation funding (BAF) rate of 1.02 for certificated employees and 1.43 for classified employees? *

The benefit allocation factor (BAF) is part of the collective bargaining tentative agreement. The Legislature can approve or reject the agreement as a whole. If the Legislature rejects the agreement, new negotiations are required.

We currently pay a "retiree carve-out," which is money set aside to supplement retiree benefits. Does that still happen with SEBB? *

Yes. School districts will still pay the “retiree carve-out” (a.k.a. the K-12 remittance) beginning January 1, 2020 for all SEBB Program benefits-eligible employees. The remittance is the amount charged to school districts, ESDs, and charter schools that provides the revenue to cover both the subsidies for K-12 retirees enrolled in PEBB. Assuming no legislative changes, those retirees will remain in the PEBB Program.

Are the tobacco use and spousal coverage premium surcharges paid by employees? Was that discussed in collective bargaining? *

The premium surcharges are paid by employees. The Legislature mandated this, and the collective bargaining tentative agreement describes it.

If an employee adds their family, how much will it cost the district? *

The district pays the same funding rate per SEBB benefits-eligible employee, regardless of whether they enroll dependents. The funding rate is calculated based on the statewide average number of dependents per SEBB benefits-eligible employee.

Do we know what the net effect of the SEBB plan is, versus the current funding? *

The Legislature is currently analyzing and discussing this.

Will employees working 630 hours or more be fully funded by the state?

This depends on the outcome of the 2019 legislative session.

How will the discrepancy in funding between headcount, FTE, and staffing reality be resolved?

Benefits are funded by the Legislature on an FTE basis. However, to help bridge the difference between FTE and headcount, the “benefit allocation factor” was approved in collective bargaining. The benefit allocation factor (1.02 for certificated employees and 1.43 for classified employees) is multiplied by the FTE to arrive at the allocation.

Will the Legislature make any adjustments to address discrepancies between headcount and FTE?

Benefits are funded by the Legislature on an FTE basis. To help bridge the difference between FTE and headcount, the collective bargaining agreement includes a “benefit allocation factor.” The benefit allocation factor (1.02 for certificated employees and 1.43 for classified employees) is multiplied by the FTE to arrive at the allocation.

Will SEBB funding be tied to prototypical school funding?

SEBB Program funding is anticipated to be calculated using the prototypical model. However, the Legislature may make adjustments.

What will the funding source be for the school districts going forward? 

The state will provide funding on an FTE basis with a benefit allocation factor applied (see above). Funding will still come from the state, and we do not yet know what funding will be required from the district. Employees will also be responsible for a portion of their medical premium.

How will the funding rate account for job shares?

If two individuals sharing one job are each anticipated to work more than 630 hours, they will both be eligible for SEBB Program benefits. The district will be required to pay the employer’s share of the benefit costs for each eligible employee.

Can the district choose how to move money around to fund two employees for one FTE?

It is beyond the scope of HCA to direct how districts choose to fund employee benefits.

Will the school district, ESD, or charter school be required to pay the same amount of the medical premium and all the complete premium for employee dental, vision, LTD, life and AD&D, regardless of the employee’s FTE, as long as they meet the 630 hour criteria?

Yes, that is correct.

Will part-time school employees pay the same monthly premiums that full-time employees pay?

Yes. All employees working at least 630 hours a year who enroll in the SEBB Program will pay a monthly premium. The premium amount will depend on the medical plan you choose and whether you cover dependents.

If a substitute qualifies for coverage mid-year and declines benefits, does the district have to pay the premium cost to HCA?

The SEB Board is developing policies to address this type of situation.

If an employee meets the eligibility requirement of working 630 hours within the school year on May 1, do we offer them coverage through August 31 (the end of the school year)?

Yes. The employee’s SEBB benefits would begin June 1 and run through August 31.

Will districts still pay the K-12 retiree remittance?

Yes. As long as K-12 retirees remain in the PEBB Program, districts will continue to pay the K-12 remittance that supports them. 

Why do school districts pay an employer contribution for employees who waive SEBB Program coverage?

The formula for insuring school district, ESD, and charter school employees and their dependents includes an estimated rate of employee waivers. If anticipated waivers weren’t factored in, that uncertainty would need to be funded by raising the amount employees pay for their benefits. The state pools funds to pay for everyone enrolled in the program. Also, keep in mind that employees who waive medical will still receive other benefits.

Why is the Legislature passing funding through the districts for SEBB benefits rather than providing it directly to HCA?

State funding for K-12 benefits is currently distributed to districts as part of general apportionment. In order to provide funding directly to HCA, the Legislature would need to restructure the K-12 benefit funding process in the budget bill, and HCA would still need to work with the districts to collect employee premium contributions and funding for any eligible staff not covered by the state funding. This funding model for SEBB Program benefits is similar to the PEBB Program benefits model, where state funds are distributed to state agencies and higher education institutions to forward to HCA along with employee premium contributions.

Will districts receive money or funded FTEs to implement the system of record and data transfer required for SEBB?

We don’t anticipate additional funding from the Legislature. However, HCA will provide technical assistance to support the transition to the SEBB Program. 

Will there be funding parity between PEBB and SEBB?

Funding parity was addressed by the Legislature in Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 6241, which intended for insurance benefit allocations for school employees to be no less than rates for state employees. The amount of funding provided for PEBB Program and SEBB Program benefits will be addressed during standard legislative operating budget processes.

Will school districts, ESDs, and charter schools have to pay the reduction in employee premiums based on the wellness incentives?

If the Legislature approves the reduction, it will appropriate funds to cover the costs of wellness incentives.

Who is doing the “contributing” in RCW 41.56 and 41.59?

The contributions referred to in these laws is supplied by the state; the state will negotiate directly with a coalition of union representatives to determine what the employer contribution will be. As part of the budget process, the Legislature determines whether to fund the negotiated agreement as part of the 2019 legislative session.

RCW 41.56.500 (3) states: “Employee bargaining shall be initiated after July 1, 2018, over the dollar amount to be contributed for school employee health benefits beginning January 1, 2020, on behalf of each employee for health care benefits.”

What is the difference between the insurance plan year and the school year?

The insurance plan year for SEBB is a calendar year, January 1 through December 31. The school year, as defined in RCW 28A.150.203(11), is September 1 through August 31. Your benefit eligibility and coverage period are based on the school year.

* New or updated February 21, 2019

How do current PEBB rules inform the SEB Board’s policy decisions?

The SEB Board makes policy decisions entirely separate from PEBB Program rules. However, HCA does use its understanding of various issues that it has developed in administering the PEBB Program to help inform the SEB Board in its decision-making process.

* New or updated February 21, 2019

In PEBB, if employees leave, their coverage ends when they leave. Is SEBB the same? *

No. In SEBB, if an employee leaves the district in the middle of the month, you cover them until the end of that month.

If an employee has worked 630 hours and enrolls in SEBB, and then their work schedule changes so they will work less, do they lose coverage? *

No. They retain coverage until the end of the school year. Their premiums will not change, unless they have a special open enrollment event and change their coverage.

How do we decide if an employee is anticipated to work 630 hours? *

District administrators will decide this, based on the SEBB Program qualifications.

Do employees who start work late in the year have to wait until the following year for benefits? *

Employees who start work late in the year can receive benefits, starting on the first day of the month after their first day of work, if one of these situations apply:

  • The employee has a 9- to 10-month appointment and is anticipated to work at least 17.5 compensated hours a week in six of the last eight partial or full weeks before summer break.
  • The employee has a 12-month appointment and is anticipated to work at least 17.5 compensated hours a week in six of the last eight partial or full weeks of the school year.

When do new employees start receiving benefits?

It depends on when they are hired.

  • In September each year, new school employees who are anticipated to work 630 hours during the school year and whose first day of work is September 1 through the first day of school are eligible for the SEBB Program. They will start coverage on their first day of work.
  • For school employees anticipated to work 630 hours during the school year and whose first day of work is at any other time during the school year, the effective date of coverage is the first day of the month following the day they begin work.
  • School employees hired late in the school year but anticipated to work 630 hours or more the following year fall into two categories.
    • Employees hired on a nine- to 10-month basis will be eligible for SEBB benefits on their first day of work if they are anticipated to work at least 17.5 compensated hours a week in six of the last eight full or partial weeks before summer break. Their benefits would begin the first of the month after they begin work.
    • Employees hired on a 12-month basis will be eligible for SEBB benefits on their first day of work if they are anticipated to work at least 17.5 compensated hours a week in six of the last eight full or partial weeks before the end of the school year (August 31). Their benefits would begin the first of the month after they begin work.

Who will track the hours of an employee who works multiple jobs in a school district to determine their eligibility for benefits?

School personnel staff will track part-time employees’ hours for all positions they fill within the district.

How do we track employees who work across multiple school districts?

Only hours worked within the same school district will count toward the 630 hours. School employees cannot add together hours from multiple districts. Only hours from one district can count toward eligibility.

If an employee works for more than one school district, how will we know if they are dual enrolled in benefits under the SEBB Program?

HCA’s system of record only allows employees to be enrolled once, within a single district.

What happens if an employee is not anticipated to reach 630 hours during the school year, but subsequently does reach 630 hours?

The employee becomes eligible on the day they are notified of the schedule change. Their coverage begins on the first day of the following month.

For example, a substitute bus driver is not eligible for SEBB benefits in September because she is anticipated to work fewer than 630 hours during the school year. But in October her work schedule changes and she is then anticipated to work more than 630 hours during the school year. She becomes eligible the day she is notified of the change, and her coverage begins November 1.

What happens when an employee hits 630 hours but is not anticipated to hit 630 hours the following year?

The employee would receive benefits in the school year they become eligible. Anticipated hours would be reassessed in September for the new school year. If they reach 630 hours two years in a row and return to the same type of position, they will be presumed eligible for the third year.

Are employees who aren’t considered full-time (like coaches, substitute teachers, etc.) eligible for benefits under the SEBB Program?

Yes, as long as they work or are anticipated to work 630 hours for a school district, educational service district, or charter school during the school year. A school year means September 1 through August 31.

What happens when an employee reaches 630 hours but decides not to bid or take shifts for the rest of the year? Do districts still provide benefits?

Yes. Districts will provide benefits to any employee who works or is anticipated to work 630 hours within the school year.

When does employee eligibility for coverage through the SEBB Program end?

The employer contribution toward SEBB benefits ends the last day of the month in which the school year ends (August 31). The employer contribution toward SEBB benefits will end earlier than the end of the school year if one of the following occurs:

  • The district, ESD, or charter school terminates the employment relationship. Eligibility for the employer contribution ends the last day of the month in which the employer-initiated termination notice is effective.
  • The school employee terminates the employment relationship. Eligibility for the employer contribution ends the last day of the month in which the school employee’s resignation is effective.
  • The school employee’s work pattern is revised such that the employee is no longer anticipated to work 630 hours during the school year. Eligibility for the employer contribution ends as of the last day of the month in which the change is effective.

If an employee meets the eligibility requirement of working 630 hours within the school year on May 1, do we offer them coverage through August 31 (the end of the school year)?

Yes. The employee’s SEBB benefits would begin June 1 and run through August 31.

If a school employee begins working full time on May 13 and is anticipated to work the next school year, when would their benefits begin?

It depends on how many hours they work during the current school year.

  • If the employee is anticipated to work at least 17.5 compensated hours a week in six of the last eight weeks before summer break (for 9- and 10-month appointees) or before August 31 (for 12-month appointees) they would start receiving benefits on June 1.
  • If the employee is not anticipated to work 17.5 compensated hours a week as noted in the first example, they would be eligible to start benefits on September 1 of the following school year.

What about transfers between districts?

You will have uninterrupted coverage when moving from one school district, ESD, or charter school to another within the same month or a consecutive month, if the following conditions are satisfied:

  • You were eligible for the employer contribution toward SEBB benefits in the position you are leaving; and
  • You are anticipated to be eligible for the employer contribution toward SEBB benefits in your new position.

* New or updated February 21, 2019

Will enrollment materials be available in languages other than English? *

SEBB My Account, the online enrollment system, will only be available in English for now. However, non-English speakers will still be able to enroll in SEBB using paper forms. The SEBB Program will provide all of our paper publications and enrollment forms in additional languages upon request. Additional supported languages include: Amharic, Burmese, Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, Laotian, Oromo, Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Tigrigna, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese.

Can I waive dental and/or vision coverage? *

No. All SEBB benefits-eligible employees will be automatically enrolled in dental, vision, basic life and accidental death and dismemberment, and basic long-term disability.

I’m waiving medical coverage. Do I have to pay the premium surcharges? *

No. The tobacco use and spousal coverage premium surcharges do not apply if you waive medical coverage.

If an employee waives coverage, does the district still pay the full employer contribution? *

Yes. The funding rate calculation assumes a certain percentage of employees will waive medical coverage, which reduces the average amount of employer funding needed per employee.

Why do school districts pay an employer contribution for employees who waive SEBB Program coverage? *

The formula for insuring school district, ESD, and charter school employees and their dependents includes an estimated rate of employee waivers. If anticipated waivers weren’t factored in, that uncertainty would need to be funded by raising the amount employees pay for their benefits. The state pools funds to pay for everyone enrolled in the program. Also, keep in mind that employees who waive medical will still receive other benefits.

If an employee waives medical coverage, but wants dental and vision coverage, does the district still pay the premiums for dental and vision coverage? *

Yes, the employer pays the premiums for dental and vision, even if the employee waives medical coverage. The employee pays out-of-pocket costs, however, including deductibles and copays.

Will employees be able to enroll using paper forms?

School employees will be directed to enroll online using a computer, tablet, or smartphone. However, for those who cannot enroll online, paper enrollment forms will be available.

Will HCA create all open enrollment materials, benefit summaries, enrollment forms, etc., or will districts be able to create their own materials for open enrollment?

Yes. The SEBB Program will create open enrollment materials — including benefit summaries, enrollment forms, website content, email messages, flyers, posters, articles, and other communications. We’ll depend on the districts to distribute much of the information to ensure that all eligible school employees receive consistent information and follow the same processes.

We are developing information for administrators preparing for this change and for all school employees regarding open enrollment.

Will HCA attend all benefit fairs during OE?

HCA staff will not be able to attend benefits fairs at more than 300 school districts, educational service districts, and charter schools during open enrollment. However, HCA staff are looking into other ways to reach employees before and during open enrollment to make sure they — and their employers' payroll and business office staff — have the information needed to take action.

More information will be available closer to the SEBB Program’s first open enrollment in fall 2019, for coverage starting January 1, 2020.

What is “dual enrollment”?

If a school employee is eligible to enroll in the SEBB Program and is also eligible as the spouse, state-registered domestic partner or dependent of another school employee, we call that “dual enrollment.” Dual enrollment is not allowed for medical, dental, or vision coverage in the SEBB Program. If an employee and their spouse or state-registered domestic partner are both eligible for SEBB benefits, they need to decide which will cover themselves and any eligible dependents on their medical, dental, and vision plans. An employee could waive medical coverage for themselves and enroll as a dependent on their spouse’s, state-registered domestic partner’s, or parent’s medical coverage. However, they must enroll in dental, basic life and AD&D, and basic long-term disability insurance under their own account.

Why is dual enrollment not allowed under the SEBB Program?

The single-enrollment policy helps maintain the affordability of the SEBB Program’s health plans. Allowing dual enrollment would increase the cost of the SEBB Program and could result in reduced benefits or higher costs in the future.

Who will be responsible for verifying family members’ eligibility for coverage under the SEBB Program?

Employees are required to provide evidence of their dependents' eligibility within the HCA’s timeframe. School personnel staff will verify dependents' eligibility for coverage. HCA staff will work with school personnel staff on how to do this.

Will existing employees be grandfathered?

No. Employees’ dependents will not automatically be enrolled in SEBB. Employees must enroll their eligible family members to have them covered.

Will school personnel staff be required to verify special open enrollment events for employees?

Yes. More information on special open enrollment will be included in open enrollment materials.

Our nonrepresented and admin groups currently have employer-paid life insurance of twice their salary. Will the listed new amount of $35,000 apply to all employees, with no additional employer-paid life insurance allowed?

Yes, that is correct.

Who will track the hours of an employee who works multiple jobs in a school district to determine their eligibility for benefits?

School personnel staff will track part-time employees’ hours for all positions they fill within the district.

How do we track employees who work across multiple school districts?

Only hours worked within the same school district will count toward the 630 hours. School employees cannot add together hours from multiple districts. Only hours from one district can count toward eligibility.

If an employee works for more than one school district, how will we know if they are dual enrolled in benefits under the SEBB Program?

HCA’s system of record only allows employees to be enrolled once, within a single district.

What about transfers between districts?

You will have uninterrupted coverage when moving from one school district, ESD, or charter school to another within the same month or a consecutive month, if the following conditions are satisfied:

  • You were eligible for the employer contribution toward SEBB benefits in the position you are leaving; and
  • You are anticipated to be eligible for the employer contribution toward SEBB benefits in your new position.

When the SEBB Program becomes effective on January 1, 2020, will the amount met toward employees’ deductibles in 2019 carry over?

No. Current plans should run until the end of 2019. January 1, 2020 will begin a new plan year and deductibles will start over.

Is there a request for proposal (RFP) date for dental?

Not at the moment. The SEB Board voted to not pursue a competitive solicitation for dental services starting January 1, 2020, but instead to leverage the current PEBB Program dental benefits. The procurements process for other benefits is ongoing, and the most current RFPs are posted on HCA’s Bids and contracts page. The procurements for disability, group vision, and fully insured group medical have all closed.

Is it true that the carriers participating in the SEBB Program also have to be part of the individual market exchange?

Yes. In 2018, the Washington State Legislature passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2408, which calls for this participation.

Of the six apparently successful bidders (ASBs) for the SEBB Program fully insured medical carriers, how many also currently provide PEBB insurance?

Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest and Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington currently offer PEBB insurance. The other ASBs are Aetna, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington Options, Premera Blue Cross, and Providence Health Plan.

Is HCA looking at a third-party administrator for a fully insured plan?

No. Typically, fully insured health care plans do not have a third-party administrator (TPA). TPAs are used to perform administrative services on behalf of an employer that sponsors a self-insured health plan.

* New or update February 21, 2019

What help will HCA offer for the process of dependent verification? *

HCA has recently awarded a contract to an independent contractor to alleviate the bulk of dependent verification during the first annual open enrollment period in 2019. Details are forthcoming.

Please note, however, this is a one-time solution. After the first open enrollment period, districts will need to manage their employees’ dependent verification for special open enrollments, new-hire enrollments, and subsequent open enrollments.

If an outside vendor does dependent verification, how do we know they’re verified? *

Both benefits administrators and subscribers will be able to see which dependents have been verified or denied on SEBB My Account, our online enrollment system. Employees will also receive a mailed letter.

Are districts going to hold dependent verification materials on file? *

No. Once the dependent verification materials are accepted, they are deleted, so neither the district nor HCA holds on to personal information. If there’s a question regarding the verification, HCA holds the digital file until the question is resolved.

Do districts have to redo all dependent verification for dependents that are currently covered by our organization’s current insurance? *

Yes. Employees will need to verify all their dependents in SEBB. The exception is if the employees currently participate in the Public Employees Benefits Board (PEBB) Program, in which case their dependent verification status will be transferred over to SEBB. After the first open enrollment, subscribers won’t have to reverify dependents that are already enrolled in SEBB.

If districts are currently participating in PEBB, do they have to do dependent verification for SEBB? *

No. If you’re in PEBB now, your employees’ dependent verification status will transfer over to SEBB.

Can employees provide dependent verification before they pick a plan? *

We’re working with a vendor to determine if that’s possible.

Is the Legislature aware of the amount of workload districts will need to undertake for dependent verification?

HCA is working with the Legislature to address the anticipated workload needs resulting from dependent verification requirements.

* New or updated February 21, 2019

Are districts going to enter data on Pay1? *

District staff and employees will use SEBB My Account, the online enrollment system developed by HCA. Pay1 will continue to be the eligibility system.

Will we use SEBB My Account for attestation? *

Yes, we’re building functions into SEBB My Account for attestations regarding the tobacco use and spousal premium surcharges.

Will SEBB My Account work for people who are visually impaired? *

Yes, SEBB My Account is being developed and tested to follow the Americans with Disabilities Rehabilitation Act (ADA) Website Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. This includes making the system friendly for screen readers to read textual information.

Why does the state bargain with unions that represent local school employees?

RCW 41.56.500 (3) requires that the state bargain for all school employees with a coalition representing school employee unions across the state over funding for health care benefits governed by the SEBB program.

What happens to school employees that are not part of a union?

All employees are treated the same, whether or not they are represented.

Who is involved with bargaining?

Representatives from the Office of Financial Management (OFM) directly negotiate with a coalition of school employee unions, with staff support from the Health Care Authority (HCA). The makeup of the coalition was determined by the unions after careful research and consideration. The coalition is responsible for making sure that all units have the opportunity to be represented.

How will the bargaining units have a voice in the bargaining process?

It is the desire of both the state and the union coalition that any tentative agreement appropriately represents the impacted employees. The Washington Education Association and the Public School Employees of Washington, as well as other relevant unions, reached out to local bargaining units to set up the coalition structure and processes.

How do school districts have a voice in the bargaining process?

It is in both parties’ interests that any tentative agreement be financially feasible and implementable at the local level, so engaging with school district administrators is key to understanding their concerns. OFM engages school districts and local ESDs to solicit feedback. In addition, OFM formed a bargaining resource team comprising school district leaders to inform proposals and concepts exchanged at the bargaining table.

That said, employers have multiple avenues for sharing their perspectives on SEBB policy decisions, including via the SEB Board meetings, which are open to the public, and through various groups that formally represent school districts, such as the Washington Association of School Administrators and the Washington Association of School Business Officers, among others.

What is the scope of bargaining?

By law, the purpose of bargaining is to determine the dollar amount to be contributed on behalf of each employee for health care benefits. The bargaining is not intended to restrict the type, quality, or specific benefit offerings that the SEBB program offers.

Is the state bargaining a dollar amount or a percentage contribution?

A dollar amount, based on the employer paying an amount equal to 85 percent of the premium for a benchmark plan. The same dollar amount is contributed for every employee eligible for the SEBB Program.

How will districts know how bargaining is going?

Collective bargaining law requires that the state negotiate in good faith with the union coalition. There are limits on what details can be shared away from the bargaining table. For the 2018 negotiations, OFM created a bargaining resource team to share news of the negotiations with school administrators.

When does bargaining take place?

In even-numbered years, between July 1 and October 1. Bargaining took place in 2018, effective for the 2020 and 2021 calendar years. In 2020, negotiations will take place for 2022 and 2023.

What happens if a tentative agreement is not reached by the October 1 deadline?

State law requires that bargaining with the union coalition be completed before October 1 to allow for a fiscal analysis of the impact of any tentative agreement. That analysis is necessary to inform the budgetary process that is the responsibility of the Governor and Legislature. In the past, with very few exceptions, this deadline has been met. For future years, the agreement stays in force if no successive  agreement is reached.

What happens if the Legislature decides not to fund a tentative agreement?

The Legislature can approve or reject the tentative agreement in its entirety. If the Legislature decides not to fund a tentative agreement, the parties are left with no ratified agreement, and both the state and the union coalition would need to return to the bargaining table.